Sunday Night Thoughts

Posted: 08/03/2008 by that's Elbert in blogging, personal
Tags: , ,

This evening I’m sitting here wanting to post something but feeling very tired. Last night while working at the part time job I had an “episode” which sent me home early and kept me home for the morning. What is an “episode”? Let me explain, at the risk of getting too personal here.

About 7 years ago I had a grand mal seizure. After that seizure and it’s subsequent treatment, my wife and I figured out that I’ve probably been having them most of my life. I’ve not had anything like that grand mal since the one mentioned above, but I’ve had what one neurologist called “pseudo-seizures” and my current one refers to as “episodes”. The “episodes” involve usually a sudden headache, some dizziness, some loss of color in the face, then they progress toward some emotional expression (usually crying), then the dreaded feeling that my wife and many other people are angry with me. Weird? Yes. This is what happened at work Saturday night. It appeared that my co-workers didn’t know what to do with me, and I didn’t know how to explain it to them. I’ve got an extended family member working there who helped me get stable, and thankfully one of the managers believed me, or at least I think he did. They called my wife who came and promptly took me home. It felt like it was two miles from the back of that store to the van. I was so tired, and yes that’s what usually follows all that mess.

These “episodes” don’t happen very often, maybe twice a year at most. They still scare the pants off of me and most people around me. At my full time job, most everyone has got the routine regarding the process so they usually are able to handle the situation. They’ve never seen it at the part time job though. What can I do for these “episodes”? Not much except get through it and sleep it off. Taking me to the ER is a waste of time unless something worse happens like if a broke a bone (like I did during the grand mal). I will probably call the neurologist tomorrow and let him know what happened just in case I need a note for the other job.

Despite all this, I’ll probably do some posting this week…

I’m also feeling a little bummed. I’m still on BlogNetNews’ Delaware Influence Chart at #12 but I’ve dropped off the chart for Delmarva. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, hit this link for all the links for BlogNetNews. I can take comfort in this: I am the self-proclaimed #1 blogger in Laurel!! Yes, I am probably vain.

In more blog news, I’d like my readers to know that July was this blog’s biggest month ever. I am very grateful for all you who visit on a regular basis. It means a lot that you like coming here again and again.

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Comments
  1. kavips says:

    Sorry to hear ’bout your episode.

    I am interested in more, since one of my children may have the same symptoms.

    Did you have these as a child, and if they were not grand mal, do either of your parents remember anything “different” about your growing up… And one further question, if you do not mind… Are you the exception in your family or do others share similar traits even if they are not as extreme as your.

    I understand about your being devastatingly tired, based on what I have dealt with as a parent… Are you familiar with the diets that have been prescribed for preventing these?

    Please do not feel compelled to answer if it is somewhat embarrassing, but I wrote this only because I guessed that you are the type of person who would not mind talking about it, so I summoned up all my bravery in order to get the courage to ask…

    I have often thought of crafting a video on how to handle someone during one of these, but thought it might be too embarassing for the subject later on in her/his life to have the record “out there” …..

    Seeing one for the first time, scares any observer a lot…. However once they come to realize that the person is not dying right in front of them, it becomes is a little easier to forbear…… Other advice would be to turn them over on their left side, talk to them gently and soothingly,(they can still hear you even though they cannot react), and pat them on the arm or shoulder as a gesture of confidence, and let them know that they have nothing to fear because someone in the know is watching over them. I would warn them about the dead eyes, the blue skin during the fourth minute, the unresponsiveness that occurs during minutes two and four, and recommend that they listen to traumatized’s heartbeat or take their pulse after they calm down to insure that it is not a heart attack underneath the symptoms… There is so much information that needs public exposure, that is unknown to most people when it hits, that which communicated beforehand, can greatly reduce the trauma felt in everyone….

    Thanks again for posting it. It is valuable information I think which needs to be shared….

  2. Kavips, let me try to respond:

    Did you have these as a child, and if they were not grand mal, do either of your parents remember anything “different” about your growing up…

    My parents didn’t notice anything unusual about my childhood. The one grand mal I had actually brought to light a lot of behavior that I had that didn’t make sense. During my teen years I would get these powerful headaches from which I only got relief by sleeping them off. We always wrote them off to a lack of sleep as they usually came at a time when I wasn’t taking good care of myself. I recall getting a weird feeling while driving through a wooded area with the sunlight coming through the trees. It created a flicker that apparently caused some minor activity but I don’t recall anything major coming from that. Through adulthood I wrote the headaches off to fatigue, but it appears they were a sign of seizure activity. Another thing that happened every so often was a blank stare that I never remember. I got wrote up for it at one of my jobs because they said I was just standing around doing nothing. I never remember the incidents they recalled to me, but now it apparently was seizure activity of which we were unaware.

    And one further question, if you do not mind… Are you the exception in your family or do others share similar traits even if they are not as extreme as yours.

    There isn’t anyone that has had this type of activity. My oldest son has had two textbook seizures, the last one happening about 4 years ago.

    I understand about your being devastatingly tired, based on what I have dealt with as a parent… Are you familiar with the diets that have been prescribed for preventing these?

    I’m not familiar with the diets. In most cases I experience a degree of fatigue after these “episodes” but it’s not a regular part of life. It usually effects me for maybe 2-3 days after these incidents.

    I hope something I’ve written helps.